Tunneling

For anyone new to jar candles, tunneling is when the wax on the edges of the glass doesn’t melt, creating a “tunnel” of wax. Tunneling will shorten the life of your candle, have a weaker thrown since the wax pool is smaller, and, IMO, doesn’t look as pretty.

My Frosty Air, I’m sad to say, is tunneling badly. While Yankee Candle has a 100% satisfaction return policy (meaning I could return this candle for a full refund), I’m going to keep it. The throw, as I promised yesterday, is very nice! I have a picture of my tunneling Frosty Air below.

Tunneling Frosty Air

There are a few fixes for tunneling candles. The best fix is to wrap a piece of heavy duty aluminum foil with a nickel to quarter size hole cut out around the top of the jar. Usually, a nice wax pool will form after an hour or two, then it will burn like normal. This one, however, took almost 6 hours to get a shallow wax pool! My half-fix is to just use an Illumalid from Yankee Candle.

Frosty Air with Hollyberry Illumalid

When using a YC jar, I highly advise using an Illumalid from the beginning to 1) reduce the chance of tunneling and 2) to look cute! They have Illumalids to match with the season and other themes. Jar shades are also cute and reduce tunneling….which is why I tend to prefer buying jars over tumblers and pillars (sometimes!). I used an Illumalid since the beginning on this candle, but sometimes you just get a bad jar. Again, if this happens to you, return it for a new one! Some YC have tendencies to tunnel. For example, I’ve never come across a Peppermint Mocha large jar that has not tunneled!

Frosty Air: A Seasonal 2011 Rare Treasure

Despite the tunneling, I can smell Frosty Air (currently in my bathroom) in the Kitchen and Living Room. My apartment is small, but the mint oils in this candle are strong! It smells like winter in here!

 

-Kari Ann-

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5 comments

  1. The reason your candle is tunneling is that you’re not burning it properly. A large jar candle needs to be lit for a minimum of 4 hours every time you burn it. The wax must be melted all the way around (from side to side) before you blow it it out. If you don’t, the wax has a “memory” and the next time you light it the candle will melt “out” only as far as the wax melted the last time and then tunnel down.

  2. That has happened to me with Yankee candles, and being tired of returning every one I buy, I don’t buy them anymore. Village candles are the best I have used. They don’t tunnel and burn evenly down to the bottom of the jar and last a very long time.

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